Category Archives: Foot Pain

Bursitis Ball Of Foot Treatment Method

Overview

Bursitis is the inflammation of a bursa within the body. A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that cushions some of the major joints, allowing bones, gliding muscles, and tissues to exist together without harming each other. It aids in reducing the friction between bones and the soft tissues above it. Though there are bursae all over the body, the main ones are located in the knee, elbow, shoulder, hip, and heel. These are also the ones that are the most often injured. Still, however, when you hear the word ?bursitis?, the person is usually referring to their shoulder, but it could also refer to any of the preceding areas–such as the second most common one, the hip.

Causes

There are several factors which can predispose patients to developing this condition. These need to be assessed and corrected with direction from a physiotherapist and may include poor foot biomechanics (particularly flat feet), inappropriate footwear (e.g. excessively tight fitting shoes), muscle weakness (particularly the calf, quadriceps and gluteals), muscle tightness (particularly the calf), joint stiffness (particularly the ankle, subtalar joint or foot), bony anomalies of the heel bone, inappropriate or excessive training or activity, inadequate recovery periods from sport or activity, inadequate warm up, inadequate rehabilitation following a previous Achilles injury, change in training conditions or surfaces, inappropriate running technique, inadequate fitness, poor pelvic and core stability, poor proprioception or balance, being overweight.

Symptoms

Bursitis involving the heel causes pain in the middle of the undersurface of the heel that worsens with prolonged standing and pain at the back of the heel that worsens if you bend your foot up or down.

Diagnosis

A good clinical practise includes evaluation of the tendon, bursa and calcaneum by, careful history, inspection of the region for bony prominence and local swelling as well as palpation of the area of maximal tenderness. Biomechanical abnormalities, joint stiffness and proximal soft tissue tightening can exacerbate an anatomical predisposition to retrocalcaneal bursitis, they warrant correction when present.

Non Surgical Treatment

During the initial acute phase of the condition, patients should apply ice to the back of the heel for 15 to 20 minutes and follow the R.I.C.E.R regime. Avoid activities that cause pain. Gradual progressive stretching of the calf muscle and Achilles tendon is also advocated. Changing the footwear. Wearing an open-backed shoe may help relieve pressure on the affected region. For those whose symptoms were caused by a sudden change from wearing high-heeled shoes to flat shoes, the temporary use of footwear with a heel height in between may be helpful. Inserting a heel cup in the shoe may help to raise the inflamed region slightly above the shoe?s restricting heel counter and relieve the pain. It is advisable to also insert the heel cup into the other shoe to avoid any leg-leg discrepancies that can lead to other problems. Training frequency and intensity should be gradually progressed with adequate rest between trainings.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery is rarely done strictly for treatment of a bursitis. If any underlying cause is the reason, this may be addressed surgically. During surgery for other conditions, a bursa may be seen and removed surgically.

Advertisements
Tagged ,